Robin:

It’s probably possible to use it. It has native parts written in C it would require some re-jigging to get the linking redone to get the Lua runtime symbols from the Iguana.exe binary (which you’ve already played with). Looks like it’s a reasonable recent project but only one contributor.

One other gotcha often with these binary lua modules is that are often not thread safe which is a headache in Iguana.

Gary:

Yes I have seen quite a few different variants of what people have done with the db merge module. At the time I saw them we didn’t have an easy means of making it possible for people to share the code – we’re gradually getting to that point where we have the means to get our user community connected – it’s a steady process of making it easier for people to make connections. Funny this week I managed to connect two different integration engineers with two different companies that were looking for people – so the connections are definitely growing…anyway I digress.

One of the challenges with the database functionality we have is that we have two important requirements we have to meet:

  1. We have to cater to a lot of people who don’t live eat and breath in the translator and Iguana. There are lots of users we have that Iguana is a very small part of the role and so they don’t get deeply involved. Especially when we have prospective new users we have to really try and make it easy for these people.
  2. Once we release an API we really have to not mess with it. It just causes too much pain for people upgrading. We have well over 50 customers that all literally have hundreds of sites for whom the pain of re-writing existing code because we made a core API ‘better’ isn’t something they will thank us for!

So we have to be very careful about what we put into our GA (generally available) releases. With the forums and the Iguana GIT repo etc. it’s a way for us to try and work more with the really technical and highly engaged people in our user community – allow them to connect with others of like mind and it’s good for getting visibility – if you ever in a position where you need to demonstrate your abilities nothing says it more than if people have already seen your contributions and the quality of your code.

Anyways that’s a long winded way of encouraging you to share code and ideas and if something drops out of it which would be useable for our more casual less technical user base we’ll be happy to push it out there – or it may be best left as a resource for those who are more in the highly technical and engaged group.

We have some interesting code to do with X12 that one of our users Austin Jones contributed – it’s in the queue to be reviewed before we try and merge into the core repo.